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Preparation and Equipment


Prior to a hunting trip, some preparation is necessary to ensure a safe and successful hunt. Time to practice firing and becoming familiar with the long arm of choice will help prevent problems during the hunt. This is a necessary step that is often overlooked; the more familiar hunters are with their long arms, the safer they can handle them.


Some equipment other than the chosen long arm must be packed for use during the hunt. This equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • Sharp knife for dressing the animal
  • Bone saw for dressing the animal
  • Field glasses or binoculars
  • Extra ammunition
  • A lunch
  • Cellular phone for contacting help if needed

Among the items listed, the items for dressing out the animal are the most necessary. For hunters attending a designated hunt, these items may not be needed because assistance dressing out the animal is often provided by hunt volunteers. However, for hunters who wish to create their own experience, it is important to gain the knowledge necessary to carry out the task of dressing out the animal. Techniques are usually taught in hunter safety classes.


In addition, proper clothing will be needed. In addition to keeping the hunter warm and dry in an outdoor setting, the clothing should also be comfortable and provide extra warmth in areas of the body that may have poor blood circulation. Some outdoor clothing is designed to generate warmth when the wearer exerts himself or herself. However, the hunter who has limited mobility should not wear this type of clothing.


Clothing that is warm and comfortable while sitting is best for hunters with mobility impairments. The most common type of clothing used in hunting is full-body coveralls in camouflage or blaze orange. This type of clothing is generally very warm, but for hunters with mobility impairments, a one-piece outfit can be difficult for dressing and undressing and can cause discomfort while in a seated position. It is best to dress in layers separating the top and bottom halves of the body. Note that state regulations require that big game hunters wear blaze orange clothing while hunting. The required amount varies from state to state.


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