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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Location


Location is a key element to a successful hunt. In states where "special" hunts and/or designated areas are planned for hunters with disabilities, locations offering good accessibility to animal traffic patterns are designed into the hunt. Hunting is generally done from a stationary position. In some cases, planned hunts are done from a vehicle such as a truck or some form of All Terrain Vehicle (ATV).

Hunters who choose to hunt independently in a general designated hunting area need to find a location that will provide them with opportunities for success. There are several factors for a hunter to consider when choosing a location. First, is the area easily accessed by vehicle or mobility device (i.e., wheelchair, scooter, etc.)? Second, is the area near known animal traffic patterns? Third, does the area offer good visibility? Fourth, if an animal is acquired, can it be easily transported out of the area? Finally, can help be acquired if needed? It is important to remember that when using a vehicle, the hunter must acquire all required permits. Visiting an area prior to a hunt will help to identify good locations.


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