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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Designated Hunting Areas


In general, states allow hunters with a disability to hunt independently in locations designated for hunting. In some cases, areas which provide good accessibility but are not normally designated for hunting are opened for use by hunters with disabilities.

In some states, designated or 'special' hunts for individuals with disabilities are held each year. These hunts are usually arranged by the state agency that regulates hunting. For example, in Indiana, the regulating agency is the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR link). For Wyoming, it is the Department of Fish and Game (Wyoming Game and Fish link). In most cases, the state agency will designate a time and location for a special hunt. Hunters then apply for the opportunity to participate in the hunt. In general, the number of hunters with disabilities selected to participate is limited by the managing agency to ensure their ability to assist the hunters with disabilities. At these hunts, volunteers are generally available to assist with finding and procuring game animals. However, hunters with disabilities are not limited to only these types of hunts.


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