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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Five Kid-Friendly Habits


Parents and educators become role models for children during adolescence. It is important to set a good example by leading a healthy lifestyle yourself and encouraging your kids to do the same.  Health habits can be formed together, and here are a few to get your kid(s) started.

    A graphic depicting 5 health habits for kids:  high five; WAM (water and milk); feel the full; less than 2 after school; move more

  • High Five: Encourage your kids to get five servings of fruits and vegetables every day.  It is important to offer them a variety of choices and introduce new foods. Try giving or getting a high five every time they eat a serving of fruits or vegetables and aim for five high fives a day!
  • WAM: WAM stands for Water And Milk. Encourage your kids to grab a carton of milk in the lunch line to maintain their daily calcium needs. Calcium is an essential nutrient for building strong bones; aim for 2 to 3 cups per day. Water is the best thirst quencher. Make sure your kids are getting 6 to 8 cups per day.
  • Feel the Full: Being mindful of our eating process reduces overeating. Notice how your stomach feels as you eat, and stop once you start to get that “full” feeling. Try eating slower so that your brain has time to tell your stomach that it really is full.
  • Less Than Two After School: Screen time is the amount of time spent watching TV, playing a video game, or using the computer. It is recommended to limit your screen time to less than two hours outside of school. Try playing a game or sport with friends or family, working on an art project, or learning to play an instrument.
  • Move More: The PAG recommends that children aim for 60 minutes a day of physical activity. Discover which activities you enjoy and ask your parents to help you do them regularly.

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