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Treatment-Nutrition


While there is not a great amount of research on the effects of physical activity on the treatment of lupus, there is even less information on diet and nutritional factors and systemic lupus. The undisputed point in the research is the necessity of a well-balanced diet including a variety of foods from all the food groups. Nutritionally unsound fad diets advocating an excess or exclusion of certain types of foods are more likely to be detrimental than beneficial. Some people with lupus have adopted special diets including nutritional supplements and fish oils, but unfortunately, there is virtually no research on this topic. What has proven helpful for people with lupus is to keep a food diary of what they eat and how they feel. This can help the health care professionals evaluate and make necessary changes to the diet.


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