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General Precautions and Procedures


As with any exercise program, general precautions and safety procedures must be installed before starting the program. During the first session, record the participant's weight and resting pulse. Begin all sessions with a resting pulse below 100, the upper limit for a normal resting pulse. (If your partner's resting pulse is consistently more than 100, check with his or her doctor to determine at what level it is best to begin exercising.)

Observe your partner's gait. If you notice any signs of instability, be extra-vigilant when he or she is moving about.

Use the "talk test." As a rule of thumb, make sure your partner can talk to you comfortably during any exercise. As long as conversation is possible, the danger of over-exertion or fatigue is minimal.

If using machines, establish and record seat adjustments and starting weight levels during the first two orientation visits.

Have subjects drink water at regular intervals and rest between sets and activities. Make sure that there is a restroom close by, since participants who drink extra fluids may require more frequent trips to the restroom.


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