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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Letter From the Director


Click the image to view this online magazine.
Dear Reader,

There are a number of barriers that inhibit physical activity in people with disabilities.
Walking outdoors, for example, is the single most common activity in the general population, but for many people with disabilities, it may not be an equally good option for promoting health and wellbeing because of certain functional limitations, safety concerns, and natural and built environmental barriers. Transportation issues, access to community fitness facilities and high unemployment/underemployment rates are additional barriers that may make it extremely difficult for people with physical, cognitive and sensory disabilities to lead active lives.

At the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), we believe that everyone can benefit from regular physical activity. NCHPAD’s mission is to encourage and support individuals with disabilities and chronic health conditions to become more physically active. Our central office, located at Lakeshore Foundation in Birmingham, Alabama, provides us with a tremendous talent pool of specialists in sports, recreation and fitness. Get the Facts will help you become more physically active or, if you are a service provider or family member, equip you with the knowledge to provide a more enriching physical activity program for your clients or loved one.

If you see anything in this booklet that piques your interest and that you would like more information on, please do not hesitate to visit our website at www.nchpad.org or pick up the phone and call one of our information specialists at (800) 900-8086. We are here to serve you 24/7!

Sincerely,
James H. Rimmer, Ph.D.
Director, National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability

 


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