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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Keep An Activity Chart


A girl, standing, plays catch with a boy in a wheelchair in a gymYou’ve probably heard of a chore chart; this is based on the same idea. Make a list of activities that your kids can do throughout the day. Get creative and make them fun. Some examples might include: shoot hoops, go for a stroll in the neighborhood, perform an activity during each commercial break like chair push-ups or jumping jacks. Next, list a reward for each activity. Try not to make all the rewards food-based unless they were really active. Some non- food based examples might include staying up a few minutes later or getting to sleep in, picking the movie or game for family night or being able to invite a friend over for a sleepover. The more activity they do during the day, the bigger their reward should be.


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