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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Plant A Garden


 Three children work in a garden

Spring is the perfect time to get outside and plant a garden, and now is the perfect time to get those seeds in the ground. Preparing the earth for planting is no easy task, though. Engage your kids in this project. They can help till the ground or dig the holes. If they can’t get down on the ground to help you, try making some raised beds or potted plants that will be easier for them to navigate. If you are like me and prefer low maintenance plants, try sunflowers or primrose, or for an edible option try beans, radishes, or strawberries.  If you have little ones that need to see the fruits of their labor (no pun intended) sooner rather than later, you should try planting different types of grass. Usually you will start to see growth in one to two days. If you want some almost guaranteed success you can skip the seed stage and purchase a plant at any of your local home improvement stores. If you can find something to plant that your kids love, it’s a great way to teach them responsibility in learning how to water and care for the plant so that it will grow. This will also keep them active for weeks to come as they tend their garden, pulling weeds and watering their plants.


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