Content
Skip To Navigation Skip to Content
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregedivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregafgivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
 

NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

Font Size:

Towards Full Inclusion In Golf


Just as you would not start a golf instructional program that puts a scratch golfer with a beginner, you would also not necessarily include all participants with disabilities with those without. However, the goal should always be full inclusion. You may not reach that goal quickly or perhaps ever, but without that as your ultimate objective, your program will never be as inclusive as it can be. This requires really thinking outside of the box, taking some risks, trying new methods, and developing new attitudes towards the inclusion of people with disabilities in a golf program. The fear and trepidation alluded to earlier in this article will quickly disappear with some experience and experimenting.

The following diagram provides a quick reference on how a golf program could promote and develop a program that includes people with disabilities. The progression along the continuum is not necessarily mutually exclusive. In other words, programs toward the right side of the continuum often are excellent feeders for an inclusive program. They can also be used as a good marketing approach to get people with and without disabilities interested in playing golf.

Continuum of Programs
Continuum of Programs

 


blog comments powered by Disqus