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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Amputation and Exercise: A Vicious Circle


Amputees have even more at stake in staying physically active, yet they have an additional hurdle to overcome. The amount of energy required during walking for people with lower-extremity (LE) limb differences is higher than for people with both legs. The higher the energy cost, the more work it takes to walk (or do any activity); therefore, the less activity the person is likely to do. This contributes to a sedentary lifestyle. Studies show that people with LE limb differences have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and Type 2 diabetes. An inactive lifestyle was listed as the major contributing factor for the increase in these secondary conditions. This stresses the importance of starting healthful eating and lifestyle habits in early life, especially for people with LE limb differences.


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