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Hippotherapy




Hippotherapy does not teach specific techniques and skills associated with riding a horse. The primary focus is on developing balance, body awareness and muscle tone in the rider by responding and interacting passively to the horse's movement. The three-dimensional rhythmical movement of the horse is similar to the human movement patterns of the pelvis while walking. By placing the rider in different positions on the horse, different sets of muscles can be worked upon. The rhythmic and repetitive movement of the horse's gait induces a constant need for the rider to adjust to the horse's movement. This natural physiological response elicited in the rider is used by the therapist to improve muscular strength, neuromotor function and sensory processing. More information on the American Hippotherapy Association (AHA) can be obtained through AHA.

 


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