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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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How Much Water Should You Drink?


By Carleton Rivers, MS, RD, LD

Different people need to drink different amounts of water but a general rule of thumb is:

Drink six to eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day;
That’s at least 6 or 8 cups of water.

six glasses of water

Tip: Carry a water bottle around with you to make sure you are drinking enough water each day.

When you’re thirsty, your body might already need water.
So grab yourself a glass of water!

You will need extra water if you...

  • Vomit or spit up
  • Have diarrhea
  • Sweat
  • Drink alcohol
  • Have a high fever

Modified Source: Beth Marks, J. S. (2010). Health Matters: The Exercise Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

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