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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Get Walking!


Walking is one of the most natural physical activities and the least likely to cause an injury. A walking program is an excellent form of exercise for people because it combines stretching, strengthening, and endurance exercises. Walking briskly while swinging your arms can almost give you all of the benefits of jogging without the strain on your body.

The Benefits of Walking

  • Walking can be done anywhere, any season of the year, at no cost.
  • You can walk alone or with others.
  • You don't need any special equipment or clothing, just comfortable shoes.
  • Walking is something you can usually do for the rest of your life.

Walking Has a Positive Effect in the Following Areas

  • Strengthens muscles (including the heart), ligaments, tendons, and cartilage and tones leg muscles.
  • Improves the body's ability to deal with sugar.
  • Strengthens the bones to prevent them from breaking, and it may slow down osteoporosis, a thinning of the bones.
  • Improves self-image and makes you happier.
  • Helps your body burn more calories, leaves you less hungry, and burns fat - you can lose weight.

Step Right This Way

  • Find a route.
  • Put on your walking shoes.
  • Warm-up and stretch.
  • Walk 15-20 minutes between 3 and 5 times each week.
  • You'll feel great!

Modified source: Beth Marks, J. S. (2010). Health Matters: The Exercise Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

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