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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Inclusive Worksite Wellness Tips


  • Include employees with disabilities in wellness program planning either on the wellness committee or working closely with the wellness coordinator to ensure program activities are accessible and meet the needs of all employees.
  • Create inclusive marketing materials by using images of people with and without disabilities, person-first language, and inclusive terminology such as “Moving Meeting” and “Run.Walk.Roll 5k”.
  • Ensure accessibility of marketing materials by providing a variety of formats such as audio, picture-based, large print and accessible electronic formats.
  • Provide relevant incentives for employees with a variety of abilities.  
  • Create accommodations when appropriate.  For example, a walking program encouraging 10,000 steps a day may not be appropriate for all employees.  Instead allow employees to track steps or movement throughout the day and encourage an increase in activity.
  • Provide a map of accessible routes to increase physical activity throughout your worksite’s campus instead of only promoting the stairs.
  • Consider a smoke free workplace policy which will impact all employees, but especially employees with disabilities who are more likely to smoke cigarettes (25.4% vs. 17.3%). 
  • Include healthy options in vending machines and ensure they are accessible to employees who may use a wheelchair.

The culture of a worksite can make or break participation in employee wellness programs.  To reap the benefits both for employers and employees consider creating a culture of inclusion, welcoming all employees to improve their health.

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