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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Introduction


Overweight and obesity in children and adults with Down syndrome is a great concern and one that should be addressed with a comprehensive nutrition and physical activity program that is tailored to the specific needs of the individual. Although the dietary recommendations for people with Down syndrome are similar to those of the general population, the approach that is used to teach them what is healthy may be different. The research on what type of nutrition interventions are effective to promote weight loss for individuals with Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities is still small; however, there are some studies that have shown promise in this field. For example, research has suggested that weight loss programs that include parental support appear to have greater success for adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome. So for parents and caregivers, it is important to not only educate about nutrition and physical activity, but to lead by example.


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