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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Deaf children are not automatically exposed to language in the same way that hearing kids are resulting in language deprivation. Language deprivation can have an impact on memory development, on cognitive development, brain developments and cognitive capacity. A team at Boston University is developing a new curriculum to help students engage in language during the early school years.

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