Content
Skip To Navigation Skip to Content
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregedivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregafgivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
 

NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

Font Size:

Sporting Opportunities


Once program considerations have been combed through and barriers addressed, it's time to play! A brief history of adapted sport is provided in the first chapter of an adapted physical education textbook by Winnick (2000). According to Wilson (2002), sports associations for people with disabilities are highly organized and thriving. The Paralympic games boast 19 sanctioned summer sports. The following sports seem particularly appropriate for children:

  1. Basketball is a sound choice for children with disabilities because they learn teamwork and wheelchair coordination.
  2. Boccia is a suitable selection for individuals with severe disabilities. The object of the game is to move the competitor's ball as near to the target as possible. This can be done by throwing, kicking, or using assistive devices.
  3. Cycling is an activity that many children perform recreationally. Competition has included athletes who have CP, VI or have amputations.
  4. Swimming is a crowd-pleaser because little needs to be done in the way of special accommodation except to provide a suitable water entry site. Once in the water, children appreciate the buoyancy and freedom of movement the water affords.
  5. Tennis works well because children can be included with minimal modifications. All that is needed is an accessible tennis court, equipment and another competitor (Wilson, 2002).

One of the more inspiring stories of the inclusion of children with disabilities into the sports arena is occurring in the southern United States. A Georgia-born nonprofit organization called the American Association of Adapted Sports Programs (AAASP) has become a leader in youth disability sports. This January, AAASP launched Project ASPIRE, a nationwide push to create school-based adapted athletic programs. A recent accomplishment of the organization was its partnership with the Georgia High School Association. As a result of this alliance, this spring, for the first time, children with disabilities could join their high school track teams to compete in the 200-meter and 800-meter wheelchair races. To help teach local high school coaches how to train athletes who use wheelchairs, Jean Driscoll, a top-ranked international competitor in wheelchair races, presented a training workshop before the season began.


blog comments powered by Disqus