Content
Skip To Navigation Skip to Content
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregedivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregafgivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
Individuals & Caregivers
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Public Health Professionals
Teachers
 

NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

Font Size:

Grains


The grain food group is made up of foods like bread, pasta, rice, oatmeal, and cereal. Whole grains (whole wheat, brown rice) are high in dietary fiber, B vitamins, and minerals such as iron, magnesium, and selenium. The dietary guidelines recommend making half of all of the grains consumed whole grains instead of refined grains (white bread). The health benefits of consuming whole grains include a reduced risk of heart disease, reduced constipation, and weight management. Fortified whole grains also provide folate which is important for pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects during fetal development.

The recommended number of servings for an average adult ranges from 3 to 4 servings of grains per day. Here are some examples of what 1 serving of grains would be:

  • 1 “mini” bagel or 1/4 of a large bagel
  • 1 small biscuit
  • 1 regular slice of bread
  • 5 whole wheat crackers
  • 1/2 an English muffin
  • 1/2 cup cooked oatmeal or 1/3 cup dry oatmeal
  • 3 cups of popped popcorn
  • 1/2 cup of cooked rice
  • 1/2 cup of cooked pasta
  • 1 small flour or corn tortilla

Here are some visuals for determining the number of servings of grains:

Image of a light bulb

  1/2 cup of cooked rice, pasta or oatmeal = regular light bulb (1 serving)

 

 

Image of a tennis ball

  1 cup of cooked cereal, rice, or pasta = tennis ball (2 servings)


blog comments powered by Disqus