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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Nutrition for Parkinson's Disease


 

Constipation, urinary tract infections (UTIs), thinning bones, and unexplained weight loss are all common in persons with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Preventing or managing these conditions can be accomplished through proper hydration and nutritional intake.

Proper hydration, which is achieved by drinking plenty of fluids, is important in the prevention of constipation and UTIs. Fluid replacement is important, especially when participating in physical activity. Be sure to drink fluids throughout the day, ideally water. Consuming fruits and vegetables, foods which are naturally high in water content, can also increase daily fluid intake. Side effects of anti-Parkinson medications or anticholinergic agents (i.e., Cogentin, Artane) may include dry mouth, feelings of thirst, thick or sticky saliva, dry eyes, and constipation. It is important to consume adequate fluids; again, preferably water, when taking medications. Aim for 8 glasses per day of water in addition to any other fluids normally consumed within the course of the day (such as juice, milk, or coffee). Remember to include adequate fiber in any healthy diet and be sure to consume adequate water when increasing your fiber intake in order to further prevent risk of constipation.

Persons with PD are also at risk for thinning bones and need to consider adequate nutritional intake to promote strengthening of bones and maintenance of bone density. This intake should include foods containing micronutrients such as calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin K. Continue to consume a variety of foods, and incorporate foods high in the aforementioned micronutrients, such as dairy products (i.e., low-fat versions of milk, cheese, and/or yogurt). Vitamin D maintains calcium blood levels in the body within normal limits, and is crucial for adequate absorption of calcium from the blood stream. If adequate calcium is not available, the body begins to break down bone in order to supply the needed nutrient. Often, vitamin D needs are not met by dietary methods alone. Recent research indicates that limited exposure to the sun during the spring, summer, and fall of 5 to 15 minutes per day (between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.) will provide the body with the current recommended amount of vitamin D. Allow some sun exposure to hands, arms, and face for a few minutes each day to total 60 minutes per week. In the absence of any sun exposure, be sure to increase daily intake of vitamin D-fortified foods such as milk and orange juice (products fortified in vitamin D indicate this message on their containers). Foods that naturally contain vitamin D include liver, eggs, and fatty fish (i.e., salmon). Healthy sun exposure and adequate nutritional intake may maximize a person's vitamin D status to promote good health. In addition to healthy sun exposure and consumption of foods high in vitamin D, persons with PD may want to speak with a primary care physician about taking a supplement.

Unexplained weight loss may also occur and may be considered a nutritional risk factor if weight loss of 10% or more of usual body weight occurs. For more information on adequate weight gain, go to NCHPAD documents titled "Are You at Nutritional Risk?" and "Sometimes it's Necessary to Gain Weight."

Reference: Holick, M. (2005). The Vitamin D Epidemic and its Health Consequences. The Journal of Nutrition; 135:2739S-48S.


The following recipes can be a part of a healthy diet by supplying vitamin D, fiber, and other important nutrients.

Healthy Salmon without the Grill
Ingredients

  • 4 salmon fillets
  • 1/3-cup low-fat mayonnaise (or plain yogurt)
  • 2 Tbs Dijon mustard (or whole grain mustard)
  • 1 Tbs liquid honey
  • 1 tsp grainy mustard
  • 1 tsp water
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp lemon juice

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 425˚ F.
  2. Place fillets on foil-lined baking sheet.
  3. Mix together mayonnaise, mustards, honey, water, chili powder, and pepper.
  4. Stir in lemon juice and brush mixture on salmon.
  5. Bake for 12 minutes or until fish flakes apart when tested with a fork.

 

Spring Bean Salad
Ingredients

  • 1 can garbanzo beans (15 ounces), drained
  • 1 cup chopped tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup cucumber, chopped
  • 3/4 Tbs diced onions
  • 1 small avocado (pitted), diced
  • 1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • 1/4 cup skim milk

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, toss together beans, tomatoes, cucumber, and onion.
  2. In a small bowl, mix avocado and yogurt to make dressing. If dressing seems too thick, add some milk.
  3. Stir into the bean mixture and chill.
  4. Serve topped with shredded lettuce and whole-wheat tortilla chips.

 

 


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