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Introduction


Taggert, H. M., Arsianian, C. L., Bae, S., & Singh, K. (2003). Effects of t'ai chi exercise on fibromyalgia symptoms and health related quality of life. Orthopaedic Nursing, 22, 353-360.

Fibromyalgia (FM) is among the most widespread of musculoskeletal disorders, affecting 6 million Americans. The condition represents a conundrum for the researcher as well as for the health care worker. Its biophysical characteristics are poorly understood along with the many associated problems, such as impaired global health, high disability level, decreased functional levels, and inadequate symptom relief. Strategies for treatment should be dynamic and include not only pharmacological, but also physical, psychological, and educational approaches. According to the researchers, the most positive treatments are those that include both mind-body therapy and exercise. T'ai Chi is often called meditation in motion and combines mind-body therapy and physical exercise.

The researchers hypothesized that there would be positive changes in pre-exercise to post-exercise scores for FM symptoms, and positive changes in pre-exercise to post-exercise scores for health status after six weeks of twice-weekly, 1-hour classes in Yang-style T'ai Chi.


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