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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Frequently Asked Questions


An Innovative Approach to Inclusive Health – FAQs

1.    Where can we obtain a list of organizations funded under cdc rfa dd-16-1603?


The CDC Disability and Health State Programs can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/programs.html.

2.    Can you please confirm the number of communities each grantee will work with?


A minimum of 1 community is required.

3.    What is the definition of Community that you are using? If we have a small population state, can we do a statewide project?

Yes, that may be possible.  We are looking for projects that have capacity built and good potential reach but also feasibility within the 12-month project timeline. Your decision of community should be based off an assessment of your partner’s capacity at community vs region vs state level. Can partners at the scale you choose address barriers to inclusion? Does the organization that will implement the program work statewide, or would it be working with multiple organizations? You will need to define and justify “community” in your application.

Example definition from CDC:
community
A specific group of people, often living in a defined geographic area, who share a common culture, values, and norms and who are arranged in a social structure according to relationships the community has developed over a period of time. The term “community” encompasses worksites, schools, and health care sites.
https://www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces/terminology.htm

4.    What is the specific expectations of the Disability Service Organization?


The Disability Service Organization will be part of your Inclusive Health Coalition.  We prioritize disability inclusion in all aspects of this project so it is open to the applicants on what the role of your program partners will be.  We would like to see an integral role from people with disabilities and the disability service organization through all elements of the project.

5.    Is the travel cost to Alabama to be included in the $50K grant award?

Yes. We want you to include travel for at least two of your key project staff to come to the Birmingham training.

6.     Is there a cap on indirect costs?

Yes, there is 10% cap on any indirect costs.

7.    Can you give us more details on the local disability organization and program implementer required? i.e. Can they be the same partner? examples would be helpful

They would not be the same partner.  The program implementer is based on which program you choose.  I’ll give you an example of Girls on the Run, an after-school physical activity program.  So this program might be implemented by a local YMCA – therefore that could be an example of who your program implementation organization would be.  Then you would want to bring on a local disability service organization which might be a disability rights and resources group or an adapted sport related program – whatever makes sense related to your project application. 

8.     Do we need to identify the adapted program in the application narrative that will be implemented in the community selected?

Yes, we do want you to go ahead and identify the adapted program but there will be time as your work through the project with us to figure out exactly where you will implement the program.  You don’t have to have all the answers in your application of program implementation but we do need to know what program you will be working with. You’ll want to choose a program that meets a need in that community based on input from the local disability partner and local implementing agency.

9.     Are there additional funds if participants require accommodations during travel?

Please include this in your budget request to NCHPAD.

10.     Do we need to include travel costs for NCHPAD staff coming to do the training in our state?

No; NCHPAD will cover its own travel costs. 

11.     Is the state/CDC funded org, the party responsible for submitting the LOI/application?

Yes.  The State Disability and Health Funded Organization is responsible for submitting as they are the Lead Applicant.  Program partners can work with the Lead Applicant.

12.     For Evaluation plan component, is there guidance on what type of evaluation is expected in the application (e.g., for Phase I and II, is process evaluation appropriate)? And will there be additional funds available for implementation?

This will be left open to the applicant, but process evaluation would be appropriate for Phases I and II.  There are no additional funds for program implementation outside of this NOFO at this time. 

13.     If there are representatives from the State Disability and Health Organizations on the line, is there a way to connect them to one of the disability organizations on the line?

If an organization is interested in working with the CDC funded Disability and Health Program which is eligible to apply, you can find their contact information on the state’s Disability and Health website or contact NCHPAD to help locate the information.

14. In the NiCIP process, where do the evidence-based adapted programs fit in?

The process is used to mobilize a group of stakeholders and identify barriers to inclusion in an adapted program. The adapted program is the focus of the planning and prioritization efforts. The end goal is greater participation of people with disabilities in the adapted program.

15. The NiCIP seems to address inclusion solutions, but does not mention anything about implementation of the evidence-based adapted program. It seems like it will be hard to keep the implementation partner at the table if implementation is not necessarily part of this funding opportunity.

Implementation is part of this funding opportunity, but planning and prioritization are required given the time-frame of the project period.  Different programs have different implementation timelines and capacity could vary between applications. 

Funds are not intended to be used for running the program (space, instructors, etc.). The implementation partner is not expected to run a ‘separate program’, but an inclusive program for people with and without disabilities. Applicants will want to identify an implementation partner who is interested in broadening their reach and adopting inclusion as a sustainable practice.

The NICIP process utilizes an “integrated knowledge translation approach” which prioritizes the inclusion of stakeholders to inform decisions and is proven to generate greater results and impact.  Example publication: https://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-017-0700-y.

16. Does the implementing organization have to already be offering the chosen evidence-based adapted program? If not, can funds from this grant be used to train the organization on the adapted program? 

The implementing organization would ideally be implementing the evidence-based program but not the adapted version. Through the NiCIP process they would get trained on how to instruct the adapted version.  However, an applicant could propose a situation where the implementing organization would be new to offering the evidence-based program and receive training on the adapted component through the NiCIP.  In the latter scenario, the applicant would need to justify existing capacity to carry out this project within the scope of the funding opportunity.

17. Can you provide examples for each of the 4 stages of the NiCIP process? Since the evidence-based programs are already adapted, this will help better define exactly what information should be gathered/tasks completed in each of the 12 steps. We are not sure what information to ask about in the community assessments and feedback – is it about the evidence-based program or about inclusion and accessibility of programs in general?

The NiCIP overview document provides an explanation of each of the stages and steps. The focus is on inclusion and accessibility of the evidence-based program. The barriers identified through assessments and feedback may be related to other programs, but the focus is towards understanding factors that affect participation in an inclusive evidence-based program implementation.

18. Personnel required to attend the training:  Is it Health Coalition Member or Implementing Organization (Healthcare providers)?  Concern that healthcare providers could not take 4 full days for training.

Your key project personnel (i.e. State Lead and Community Leads) should be in attendance at the Birmingham Orientation Workshop.  The Community Onsite Workshop should be attended by the Coalition members, implementing organization members and key project personnel.  Before Stage 3 of the NiCIP is when your program implementers (i.e. healthcare providers) would be trained to deliver the adapted program.  This could be done as part of the Community Onsite Workshop or as a seperate training depending on your project and timeline.

19. The link to the Obesity Prevention SNAP-Ed program isn't going to the right place.

It looks like SNAP-Ed has revised their website so that link was broken.  This is the link we would refer you to https://snapedtoolkit.org/.  We are also posting the addendum that was created for adapting the SNAP-Ed program titled – “Inclusive Nutrition Strategies for SNAP Settings”.   This is now updated on the Evidence-Based Programs PDF as well.  SNAP-Ed is not necessarily a “program” but provides a list of evidence-based interventions and the way it is delivered in states varies.  An appropriate application could match with how SNAP-Ed is delivered in your state.

20.    In order for a current DPP site to implement this curriculum, what are the training requirements for the instructors and how long does it take? Is there a cost associated?

Prevent T2 for All is a CDC-approved National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP)  curriculum and in order for it to be implemented,  the 2018 CDC Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) Standards and Operating Procedures are followed.  For Prevent T2 for All, training is provided by a NDPP Master trainer in partnership with NCHPAD.  The State or partnering organization should identify a Master Trainer who will work with NCHPAD to prepare and conduct the training.  Following the training, participants are provided the curriculum via an electronic file sharing service.  NCHPAD does not assume responsibility for copying the curriculum.  The National DPRP Standards require that anyone wishing to use any CDC-approved curriculum be trained on that specific curriculum.  The training for Prevent T2 for All can be conducted in one of two ways.  For individuals who have never been trained as an NDPP Lifestyle Coach, (the name for a basic level trainer,)  they must first be trained to become one by a Master Trainer.  Most Master Trainers follow the CDC recommendation of 12 hours.  Participants would then have to take an additional 4 hours of training on the Prevent T2 for All inclusive curriculum, for a total of 16 hours/2 full work days of training.  Current Lifestyle Coaches are only required to take the 4-hour Prevent T2 for All/inclusive DPP training.

21.    What portions of the current T2 curriculum have been adapted and how is it different?

Using NCHPAD’s GRAIDs framework, the entire Prevent T2 curriculum was reviewed and adapted to create the inclusive  Prevent T2 for All curriculum.  The format mostly mirrors the CDC’s 2016 Prevent T2 curriculum   The major differences include highlighted inclusion adaptations in the Lifestyle Coach Manuals, non-highlighted adaptations embedded into the Participant Manuals, and most significantly a  14-page addendum that addresses procedures the Lifestyle Coach goes through to make the program inclusive (e.g. appropriate questions about providing accommodations, ensuring accessible training sites, identifying participants with disabilities etc.)  Beyond these common procedures, the level at which inclusion is addressed in each lesson can vary. 

22.    For the Prevent T2 for All curriculum, is there additional data that must be collected?

Yes, as part of the NiCIP, we are looking for communities to collect additional data from the typical T2 curriculum. data will be collected from those participating in the NiCIP process and adapted program. This includes members from your office, the community leads you identify, instructors of the program, inclusive health coalition members, leadership staff at community organizations, and adapted program participants. Data will also be collected about the local community environment.  The specific data to be collected related to program implementation will be planned by the inclusive health coalition as part of the planning process done in the NiCIP.

23.    Once a site is offering this curriculum, are the classes open to everybody?

They are open to anyone who meets the requirements outlined in the 2018 CDC DPRP Standards, page 3&4 “Participant Eligibility.”  The program is for adults who are considered prediabetic.  It is not appropriate for those who already have a diagnosis of diabetes. The intent is to have an inclusive class for people with and without disabilities and not one that only has people with disabilities.

24.    For the grant, do the sites have to recruit a certain number of people to the workshops?

There is not a specific requirement for participant recruitment as part of this project.  Best practice does state that 10-12 participants is an effective class size for a single lifestyle coach. 

Stakeholders should be recruited to the Inclusive Health Coalition to become active members. The number will depend on the community, the program, and other contextual factors.  It is more about having good representation from the stakeholders the leadership team identifies as being important to recruit.

It important to understand that the NiCIP is a planned action process and program implementation does not occur until Stage 3 of the NiCIP process.  Successful applicants will need to complete Stages 1 and 2 of the NiCIP process before starting program implementation.  Applications must be submitted by the existing state funded disability and health awardee, and may not duplicate current programmatic efforts.

25. What kind of data will be collected and how will it be shared?  Are the results of this research intended to be published without restrictions?

 As part of this project, data will be collected from those participating in the NiCIP process and adapted program. This includes members from your office, the community leads you identify, instructors of the program, inclusive health coalition members, leadership staff at community organizations, and adapted program participants. Data will also be collected about the local community environment.

Data will be shared in aggregate through reports and publications and will not be made to identify any individuals.

Also, note that as part of a CDC funded project, evaluation of this project is considered ‘program evaluation’ and not ‘human subjects research’. Generally, this means that it gets put in the exempt category for most IRBs.


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