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More Self-Monitoring Tips


Other examples of self-monitoring tools include weighing weekly, using a fitness tracker, keeping a mood journal, or creating your own progress chart for you to keep up with.

If you decide to self-monitor, keep a few of these tips in mind:

  • Be True to Yourself. Honesty is the best policy when it comes to self-monitoring.  Honestly recording your behavior will only help you in the long run to gain a truly accurate picture of how you are progressing.
  • Consistency. Regularly keeping track of your behavior is important.  An effective way to detect themes, patterns, and to see tangible results is to track consistently.  If you miss a few days or even a week, don't stop, just pick up where you left off!
  • Timeliness. Recording your behavior shortly after the behavior is performed is the best way to keep an accurate account.

Check out the PDF for a printable version to reference!

 

Click here to download infographic.

 

Sources:
Hartmann-Boyce, J J (01/2017). "Cognitive and behavioural strategies for self-directed weight loss: systematic review of qualitative studies.". Obesity reviews (1467-7881)

Burke, Lora E LE (01/2011). "Self­monitoring in weight loss: a systematic review of the literature.". Journal of the American Dietetic Association (0002­8223), 111 (1), p. 92

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