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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

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Safety Considerations


The most important consideration when beginning and increasing your level of activity is safety. Keep these things in mind when you exercise:

  • First and foremost, talk with your healthcare provider for advice and an understanding of your health. Know the condition of your heart, feet, kidneys, eyes and any other parts of your body that may have been affected by diabetes.
  • Have your glucose meter and a fast source of carbohydrates with you at all times.
  • Avoid dehydration by drinking plenty of water before, during and after exercise.
  • If outdoors or alone, wear your medical ID bracelet and carry a cell phone with you.
  • Avoid extreme temperatures, hot or cold.
  • Be good to your feet by wearing appropriate footwear and socks for whatever activity you are engaging in. Good shoes might be the most important part of your attire! Inspect your feet for any redness, blisters or irritation and see your doctor if you suspect any injury to your feet.
  • Learn all you can from fitness professionals and other reliable sources about safe and effective exercise techniques and progression that align with your fitness level and goals.
  • Stop exercise if it hurts or if you experience any lightheadedness or shortness of breath.

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