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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

Athlete Profile: Mickey Bushnell


Image of a young man with an amputation using a lumbar sacral spinal agenesis using a T53 wheelchair racer.
Barnet, 6-5-06, Mickey Bushell, photo by Mark Shearman
Mickey Bushnell was born on June 8, 1990 in Telford, UK where he still resides today. He was born with a rare congenital disorder called lumbar sacral spinal agenesis, which means that the lower part of his spinal column and pelvis failed to fully develop. Mickey mainly uses his wheelchair for mobility outdoors, but can easily get around indoors by walking on his hands.

Despite Mickey's disability and his young age, he has accomplished some amazing feats in the world of adapted sports. He is a wheelchair athlete on the world-class development squad and is currently the fastest T53 wheelchair racer over 100m. The 100 m is his best event; however he takes part in wheelchair racing events up to 8 miles. Mickey also competed in the Tyne Tunnel 2k, which is possibly one of the world's fastest races. In addition to wheelchair racing, Mickey has also tried his hand at other sports such as rock climbing and canoeing.

Mickey holds many records and has won numerous awards in wheelchair racing. Some of his career highlights include: 2006 Under 17 Winner of the London Mini Marathon, 2005 Under 16 boys World 100m and 200m Combined Sprint Champion, 2005 Disability Sport England 100m Men's British Open Champion, 2005 Under 17 D.S.E.'s T53 boys 100m, 200m, 400m National Champion (holding all three National Records), 2004 Under 15 T53 Boys National Champion in 100m, 200m, 400m (with national Records in the 200m and 400m) and the 2003 Under 13 winner of the London Mini Marathon for the second year in a row.

Mickey also competed for Great Britain at the IPC World championships in Assen in September 2006. He raced a personal best in the 200m, and with the combined 100m and 200m score system he came in second overall for his category. In the future, Mickey hopes to compete for Great Britain in the Paralympics in either 2008 or 2012 with the goal of winning the gold. He also began college this September to study Sports Science. If you would like more information about Mickey, visit his website, http://www.mickeybushell.co.uk



Disclaimer: Proper precautions must be taken before you begin an exercise program. An understanding of your current health status and potential problems is necessary for you to exercise safely. Please contact your physician if you have any concerns. This program is intended to incorporate high-intensity physical activity into your daily life, but should not be used in place of physical therapy, professional medical advice, or treatment.


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