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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

High-Intensity Weight Training for People with Disabilities


Disabilities should not deter people from attaining the positive benefits of a well-structured weight training program. Strength training increases muscle size, improves muscle endurance, prevents bone loss, and increases self-esteem. Weight training will not only make a person stronger, it can also help to ward off common injuries to areas such as the shoulders and elbows. More importantly, people with disabilities should partake in weight training activities to the extent their abilities allow to prevent loss of function or autonomy.


Disclaimer: Proper precautions must be taken before you begin an exercise program. An understanding of your current health status and potential problems is necessary for you to exercise safely. Please contact your physician if you have any concerns. This program is intended to incorporate high-intensity physical activity into your daily life, but should not be used in place of physical therapy, professional medical advice, or treatment.


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