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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

College Bound


By Allison Hoit

You’re finally a college student, absorbing every exciting bit of your new found independence!  The semester is already off to a bang, football season is right around the corner, you’ve made friends with fellow dorm residents, and the last thing on your mind is that ‘e’ word- exercise

The first year of college is often challenging for many young adults.  Independence is great, but it also comes with a catch: responsibility.  No one is there to cook dinner or wash clothes and the word convenience becomes the norm.  Convenience can mean fast food, eating every meal in the campus dining hall, or skipping your usual workout time because you would rather hang out with friends.  Despite your busy schedule- which I hope consists of studying- what if I told you that you could get a beneficial workout in just fifteen minutes without even having to leave your dorm room?  How’s that for convenience!

The “Freshman Fifteen” is a popular societal belief, but there is limited research to determine if it is truly accurate.  Research reports conflict on the actual number of pounds gained during the first year of college, but most do conclude an increase in weight and that the prevalence of weight gain for this group is greater than the general population.  Therefore, college students are more susceptible to weight increases and the health conditions that can complement so striving to reach the recommend amount of physical activity (150 minutes per week) should be a part of every college student’s routine.


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