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NCHPAD - Building Healthy Inclusive Communities

Spring into Action!


By: Allison Hoit

The temperature outside is starting to increase and long dark days are beginning to cease.  Spring is the perfect time of year for everyone – especially youth — to get out and be active!  The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG) for Americans are well established as the standard minimum recommendations for physical activity levels. To mark the fifth year of the PAG release, a subcommittee of experts has compiled a new report on Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth. This report highlights five key settings for youth to be physically active with evidence-based recommendations for each. The five settings are school, preschool and childcare centers, community and the built environment, family and home, and primary care. The underlying concept is that youth should engage in 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity. Here is a simple message for you to remember and share with others:

Sixty minutes or more a day, where kids live, learn and play!

 


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